LAce with button hole and Oslo stitches

Light and Lacy/Silver Project

I’ve been playing with a lace pattern for the Ravelry nalbinding group’s Light and Lacy challenge and my local fiber fair’s “Silver” craft along.  Third try is the best so far.

The base row is Oslo. Then in every other stitch I do button hole stitch. then a row of regular button hole stitch. All stitches are tightened around my needle. When I do another Oslo stitch row, I pick up one button hole stitch and do an Olso stitch, then I do one Oslo stitch unattached to the previous row.

I increased on the Oslo stitch row and the first button hole stitch row at the edges, which gave about a 60 degree triangle. I wanted about 90 degrees for a shawl, so maybe I should have increased every row and stopped thinking like a knitter! So this will be a pointy edged scarf, instead of a shawl.

The piece is curling A LOT and I have to untwist my yarn on my needle often. I think I’m going to have to block this. Though, most nalbound items, I don’t block.

Anyhoo – hopefully that’s enough info to play with or inspire you to try your own nalbinding lace!

Build Up Start

Build Up Start For Nalbinding Stitches with Many Loops

Tutorial by Amy Vander Vorste

We’ll start building up loops on and behind our thumb for a nice clean start to our work. There’s more than one way to do this. Here’s my favorite. I’ll be setting up for Finnish 2+2 stitch.

1. From inside of thumb to outside of thumb, wrap yarn around thumb (over nail and around) twice. The first wrap should go over the tail to lock it down.

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2. Pull working yarn back and put needle under the loops on your thumb (on the inside of thumb), then pull through. This will secure the tail and give you the same setup as your stitches, with the working yarn under the thumb loop.  (You want only 2 loops around your thumb at the end of this step.)

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3. Pull top loop off thumb to do an Oslo Stitch (1 on thumb, 1 behind thumb).

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4. Push 1 loop back behind thumb. Do one Mammen stitch (1 on thumb, 2 behind). (2 sts completed now)

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5. Now you are ready for Finnish 2+2 (2 on thumb and 2 behind) in the same 2 loops behind thumb. (St number 3).

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Now you’re ready to go with more Finnish 2+2 stitches in the usual manner.

This same build up start can be used when attaching a new row to an existing row of work. (Say we want to add a short row for shaping, or attach another strand to make a braid, etc.) Just put the two loops on your thumb and push one back, then pick up the loop of your stitch on the existing work and continue your new stitches as you would in the directions above.

The PDF for this can be downloaded from Google Drive.

stitch connections

Nalbinding Stitch Connections – What are F1, B1, etc?

A few days ago, I saw a nalbound sock on one of the Facebook nalbinding groups, and wasn’t sure how the creator did that effect. She didn’t answer (and I wasn’t surprised – the group isn’t in English and that’s all I speak).
So I worked on a set of samples, so I could figure out that ridged effect and so I could more clearly see the difference between different types of connections for nalbinding. Here are my samples and what I learned.
(– Updated 2/4/2015 to show the needle in position for the connections.  Samples done in Oslo stitch.)
Nalbinding Stitch Connection Samples
F1

 

Nalbinding Stitch Connection – F1 – You put the needle through the front of the top loop of next stitch in the previous row. A very flexible join to the row. The Oslo stitch has nice drape with this connection.

F2

 

Nalbinding Stitch Connection - F2
Nalbinding Stitch Connection – F2 – You put the needle in the front of the loop for the next stitch in the previous row, and also the previous stitch in that row (aka the loop that has a stitch in it already). A denser fabric, solid join.

B1

 

Nalbinding Stitch Connection - B1
Nalbinding Stitch Connection – B1 – You put the needle through the back of the top loop of next stitch in the previous row. Tighter than the F1 connection and it gives an interesting texture between the rows – almost like weaving.

M1

 

Nalbinding Stitch Connection - M1
Nalbinding Stitch Connection – M1 – You put the needle through the front of the middle of next stitch (the part of the stitch that lays in the opposite direction) in the previous row. Dense fabric with ridges on the back.

M1 (back side)

 

Nalbinding Stitch Connection - M1 in back
Nalbinding Stitch Connection – M1 in back – You put the needle through the middle of next stitch (the part of the stitch that lays in the opposite direction) on the back side of your work in the previous row. Dense fabric with ridges on the front. I’m pretty sure this is how the ridged socks were done.

M1 F1

 

Nalbinding Stitch Connection - M1+F1
Nalbinding Stitch Connection – M1+F1 – You put the needle through the front of the middle of next stitch (the part of the stitch that lays in the opposite direction) and the top loop of that stitch in the previous row. Dense fabric with no ridges.

*Note: There is another connection I’ve seen B1+F1 for the Asle stitch. But “B1” means “bottom loop” here.  Just so you know.

 

So, there you have it. I’d like to encourage you to make your own samples like this so you can see the difference for yourself.  Even different stitch samples are helpful to see what you may want to use for a project. I’d love to see your samples and hear what you learned from them!